cannabis-plant

Cannabis / Marijuana, STAFF NEWS & ANALYSIS
Why New Regulation Banning “Synthetic Marijuana” is Ignoring the Root Issue
By The Daily Bell Staff - April 07, 2017

The government’s solution to every problem they create is to just pass more draconian rules on top of the immense pile of crap they have already dumped on Americans.

The Drug Enforcement Agency will publish a new rule on Monday banning five forms of synthetic marijuana, sometimes called “spice” or “K2”.

This action is based on a finding by the Administrator that the placement of these synthetic cannabinoids into schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act is necessary to avoid an imminent hazard to the public safety. As a result of this order, the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to schedule I controlled substances will be imposed on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, import, export, engage in research, conduct instructional activities or chemical analysis, or possess), or propose to handle, [five types of synthetic cannabinoids].

Synthetic marijuana is a man-made creation which is said to mimic the effects of marijuana.

Except that sometimes it makes you go crazy and die.

As I am sure you are aware, no death has ever been recorded as a direct result of marijuana–though every once in a while the media claims someone kills themselves after eating special brownies.

“Spice” however, has killed directly, and it is actually chemically addictive. The drug regularly makes users do crazy things, like walk into traffic, pass out in public, slip into comas, and every once in a while, murder their children.

So it may sound like spice should be illegal, (if you think prohibition ever really works).

But one problem is that the DEA already made five types of the synthetic cannabinoids illegal.

In 2011, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) placed five compounds that are commonly found in K2 on its list of illegal substances, to help clamp down on sales. But manufacturers responded by tinkering with the chemicals to sidestep the regulations.

This led to the creation of newer versions of K2 that are even more harmful than early versions, Scalzo said. The newest products on the street can cause low blood pressure and a slow heart rate, and may even result in coma, seizures and kidney damage, he said.

And because the compounds in the drugs can constantly change, their effects on users can be unpredictable and, in some cases, deadly.

Apparently, the DEA will just continue to make compound after compound illegal. That should do the trick… it’s worked so well in the past.

Or We Could Just Try Freedom

Spice has been a legal substitute for marijuana. People smoke it as an alternative to weed.

So wouldn’t the sane thing to do be legalize real marijuana? The risks of real pot pale in comparison to K2. This includes personal health risks due to the actual substance, as well as risks of injuries to oneself and others while using real cannabis.

It is insane that the reaction to an increase in the use of fake marijuana involves no discussion of the regulations which pushed the increase, the original laws which made cannabis illegal!

The same thing happened during prohibition of alcohol in the 1920’s when people turned to dangerous alternatives to commercially produced alcohol.

Legalize weed, and all the issues involving fake cannabinoids will go away. And it might even inadvertently solve a little bit of the opioid crisis–some people are only introduced to harder drugs because the same person who sells them weed also peddles heroin.

Prohibition doesn’t work! People come up with a replacement for whatever is banned, and look where it leads: to people overdosing and harming themselves and others with a far more dangerous alternative.

The only thing which can make you crazier than smoking spice is dealing with United States Government regulations.

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in Cannabis / Marijuana, STAFF NEWS & ANALYSIS
  • “So wouldn’t the sane thing to do be legalize real marijuana?” Actually, no, the real solution would be to DECRIMINALIZE cannabis, that is, remove any statutory garbage that interferes in human beings’ innate, natural right to choose what substances they put in their bodies.

    • Good call.

    • william readling

      I’m afraid if cannabis is decriminalized, then the federal government will impose civil penalties for it’s possession.

      • LawrenceNeal

        It’s obvious than cannabis criminalisation is about protecting profits, not protecting people.

        • william readling

          And that is why civil penalties collectible by governments, and by corporations will be codified into law.
          Actually, it’s corporation profits, government agency budgets, and government employee salaries, and benefits.
          It’s all one big pustule of graft, and corruption. When the American people finally understand this, there will be hell to pay. No wonder govenments are afraid of social media. Truth can travel too fast for their comfort.
          In future histories, the persecution of the drug war will be compared with the NAZI persecution of disfavored minorities, the various Roman Catholic inquisitions, and witch hunting.

    • Sam Fox

      brtanner, that is not enough. I agree with william reading. A good start, but we need to let the medicinal herb cannabis be available to adults who want it even if to use to just get high. I do think it should be illegal to give to kids as the human body doesn’t stop developing till around 25 years of age. Medical exceptions I agree with though.
      I do know that I was VERY relieved when I found out some years back that my 2 kids were smoking pot instead of drinking. I would have preferred them to abstain from even grass, but they did turn out OK.
      SamFox

  • acumen

    ” And it might even inadvertently solve a little bit of the opioid crisis–some people are only introduced to harder drugs because the same person who sells them weed also peddles heroin.”

    Whoa! Slow down there, Henry! From where do you derive this bit of information? In over fifty years of purchasing marijuana in its many forms, I have yet to run across anyone who offers up some China White instead of Humboldt Green. And of the many thousands of Cannabis lovers known to me, not one has an interest in heroin. Your inference that some gateway exists and that purveyors of pot ought to be aware of the full potential of their clientele smacks of sentiment right out of the 1950’s.

    Now that weed is completely legal in my State, I don’t have to worry about these issues any longer.

    • Admittedly, it was anecdotal evidence. We’re glad you have never run into heroin. Generally, your experience seems to be the norm. It may have been the regional influence of Massachusetts, which has an especially potent problem with heroin, that influenced that sentence.

  • SnakePlissken

    Putting a benign substance like pot on the Schedule 1 list along with heroin is actually creating a market for more damaging substances like spice/k2. Thanks government, for further wasting my tax dollars to justify your incompetence.

    • william readling

      Putting heroin in the schedule one category is insane. With diacetyl-morphine(heroin), you can relieve more pain, before you depress respiration. That is why heroin became popular in the first place. For the same amount of pain relief, it is safer, or if you prefer, you can relieve more pain, without stopping the patient’s breathing.
      If morphine has medical uses, it is clear diacetyl-morphine has them. How can the courts allow the obvious lie, that it has no medical use to be sustained by the DEA? There are deaths in the US of patients receiving legally prescribed morphine, that would not happen if the patient received a pain relieving equivalent of diacetyl-morphine. There are people in terrible agony, because diacetyl-morphine is not available to them. One can only hope some of them are congressmen, federal judges, and federal law enforcement personnel.

  • notwithabang

    “(Legalize)…And it might even inadvertently solve a little bit of the opioid crisis” – definitely, but an additional reason to the one you quoted: pain relief for those in genuine distress with chronic pain. I would never wish to again swallow prescribed Oxycontin (for 5+ years) should an alternative exist.

    Assuming Cannabis works for pain-relief/improved quality of life for the afflicted (I don’t know from personal experience), it might just save people from the clutches of Big Pharma’s opiates too.

    • Sam Fox

      notwithabang, Good high grade cannabis works very well for pain. And a long list of other ailments. It can def make ya ‘loopy’, but it’s a fun one. 🙂
      If I had to choose between Rx crap or the pain I have now, I’d go with the pain.
      The problem with all drugs is that our bodies adapt to them, building up a tolerance. Even cannabis, though cannabis is not physically addicting like many Rx pain relievers & heroin.
      I get around the ‘tolerance thing’ by using one strain for 3-4 nights then using another in like manner. I have a back disease that has given me a nice fish hook appearance. I joke that “If I wore a ladies boa & got near a lake, the fish would jump out the water to take the hook.” 😉
      I don’t sit around all day toking up. I only need a small amount at night so I can sleep & exercise my neck to keep it from calcifying & stiffening.
      Hope that helps.
      SamFox

      • notwithabang

        Thanks Sam, that was informative; pain sure is one way to know one is alive and not dreaming! Perhaps acceptance of pain is key, and you have clearly done so given you’ve retained a sense of humour.

        I have smoked weed a few times for a lark so I understand the “loopy” comment. I never had access to sufficiently high grade cannabis to consider using it for pain relief – but know of people that do treat chronic conditions in this manner. I have been free of pain for a few years now but mine is a condition that could recur. At least I have an option regardless of the legal complications, and I appreciate the feedback.

        All the best, wishing you relief – and do not bait that hook!

loading